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Titre article 1-17
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1. Efficacy of behavior modification and yoga among the adolescent

Article 1.1-17
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Efficacy of Behavior modification and Yoga module was aimed to facilitate adolescent students diagnosed with Emotional and Behavioural problems. The purposive sample for the current study consisted of 47 adolescents (Boys=22, Girls=25) selected from Sree Konaseema Specialities Hospital, Amalapuram, East Godavari of Andhra Pradesh. Youth Self Report developed by Achenbach (2001) was used. The tool assesses emotional and behavioral problems of adolescents between 11-18 yrs. Statistical tests used for the present study included Mean, Standard Deviation, t-test and Paired Sample t-test. The results observed a significant difference between pre-test and post-test measures of Emotional and Behavioral problems on the application of Behavior Modification and Yoga module as an intervention for the adolescent students.

Keywords: Adolescent, Behaviour Modification, Efficacy, Yoga and Emotion

 

Article1.2-17
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Srimannarayana Rao Kothuri
Research Scholar, Department of Psychology and Parapsychology, Andhra University

 
MVR Raju Professor
Department of Psychology  and Parapsychology, Andhra University    
 
 118 KB
Language: English
 
Titre article 2-17
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2. Anthropometry & dental caries among intellectually disabled

Article 2.1-17
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Background and objectives: Intellectually disabled (ID) children are at a high risk for developing malnutrition which results in poor oral health. The aim of the present study is to assess and compare the anthropometric measures and oral health status of intellectually disabled and normal children.

Methods: A case-control study was conducted from March to May 2015, among 2-5 year old ID children in Sriganganagar, Rajasthan, India. The study sample comprised of 150 cases and controls each. The data was recorded during a face to face interview by two examiners (k= 0.81). A proforma gathered information regarding the type of disability, socio-demographic factors, sweet score and oral hygiene habits. The socio-economic status (SES) was assessed according to the revised Kuppuswamy’s SES scale. The clinical examination included anthropometric measures and the dmft index.

Results: In the study group 71 (47.33%), 45 (30%) and 34 (22.6%) children had mild, moderate and severe disability, respectively. Around 95 (63.3%) of the parents were graduates or had higher education qualification. Around 88 (58.70%) subjects were living in a nuclear family. A significant difference was reported among cases and controls in relation to Body Mass Index and sugar scores (p<0.05). The dmft was found to be greater among cases compared to controls with respect to underweight and normal weight categories (p<0.05).

Conclusions The present paired study uncovered the poor nutritional and oral health status of the ID children as compared to their siblings which was influenced by the disability and Intelligence Quotient levels. Due to limitations in intellectual functioning and adaptive behavior of ID children there is an urgent need of strategies to be implemented by the public health dentist towards making a balance between oral and nutritional health status of this group, including health education for their parents or guardians.

Key words: Intellectually disabled- siblings- nutritional status- anthropometry

  

Article 2.2-17
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Dr. Nikita Goyal, Post graduate student
Department of Public Health Dentistry, Surendera Dental College and Research Institute, Sri Ganganagar Goyal.
Email:: nikita26@gmail.com
 
Dr. Simarpreet Singh, Head of Department
Department of Public Health, Dentistry Surendera Dental College and Research Institute, Sri Ganganagar
Email: drsimarpreet@gmail.com 
 
Dr. Anmol Mathur, M.D.S
Reader Department of Public Health Dentistry, Surendera Dental College and Research Institute, Sri Ganganagar
Email: dranmolmathur@gmail.com
 
Dr. Diljot Kaur Makkar, Senior Lecturer
Department of Public Health Dentistry, Surendera Dental College and Research Institute, Sri Ganganagar
Email: djpublichealthdentist@gmail.com
 
Dr. Vikram Pal Aggarwal, Senior Lecturer
Department of Public Health Dentistry, Surendera Dental College and Research Institute, Sri Ganganagar
Email: 
drvikramaggarwal@yahoo.com
 
 164 KB
Language: English
 
Titre article 3-17
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3. An understanding of basic mathematical concepts by students with mild intellectual disabilities through the use of online digital games

Article 3.1-17
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The purpose of this research is to examine the influence of a special education program, incorporating online digital games, on the understanding of basic mathematical concepts by students with mild intellectual disabilities. The research involved four students (one girl and three boys) with mild intellectual disabilities divided into two groups, an experimental (combined intervention) and a control group (standard intervention). The students' performance was assessed before the intervention program, immediately after the end of the program and two weeks after the completion of the intervention. Based on the results, improved performance was observed in the experimental group’s students, in the areas of intervention, in relation to the students in the control group. The experimental group’s students continued to perform at high standards, contrary to those of the control group. The findings show that the teaching approach integrating online digital games has a positive impact on the understanding of basic mathematical concepts by students with mild intellectual disabilities.

Keywords: Mild intellectual disability, mathematical performance, basic mathematical concepts, online digital games.

   

Article 3.2-17
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John Manginas¹, Constantinos Nikolantonakis²
 
¹Special education teacher (msc Bilingual Special Education), 1st Primary school, Filippiada, Preveza, Greece
Email: johnmagginas@yahoo.gr
 
²Associate Professor, Department of Primary Education of the University of Western Macedonia, Florina, Greece
Email: kostas_nikolan2000@yahoo.gr
 
 286 KB
Language: English
 
 
Titre article 4-17
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4. Degree of intellectual disability, socio-demographic factors and manual dexterity as determinants of the periodontal status of intellectually disabled (ID) individuals

Article 4.1-17
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Objectives: This study aims to assess the degree of intellectual disability, socio-demographic factors and manual dexterity as determinants of the periodontal state of the intellectually disabled (ID) of the north western part of India.

Methods: A cross-sectional study of questionnaires was carried out between 150 subjects via face-to-face interviews by two examiners (k = 0.86), on the type of disability, socio-demographic factors and oral hygiene habits. Clinical examination was conducted for manual dexterity and periodontal health assessment.

Results: There were no statistically significant differences between the ID subgroups in terms of gender, number of siblings, income, habits, visit to the dentist, reason for visit to the dentist and manual dexterity of brushing.

The mean plaque, gingival and CPITN score scores of severely disabled subjects were significantly higher.

Conclusions: Periodontal health is a major problem for schoolchildren with disabilities; Therefore, oral health promotion programs should target institutions and parents of children with disabilities

Keywords: Intellectual disability, Socio-demographic factors, Manual dexterity, IQ, Periodontal status

 

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Article 4.2-17
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Dr. Puneet Kaur, Post graduate student
Department of Public Health Dentistry, Surendera Dental College and Research Institute, Sri Ganganagar, Rajasthan, India
Phone: +919636007605
Dr. Simarpreet Singh, Professor and H.O.D
Department of Public Health Dentistry, Surendera Dental College and Research Institute, Sri Ganganagar,Rajasthan, India
 
Dr. Anmol Mathur, Associate Professor
Department of Public Health Dentistry, Surendera Dental College and Research Institute, Sri Ganganagar, Rajasthan, India
 
Dr. Diljot Kaur Makkar, Senior Lecturer
Department of Public Health Dentistry, Surendera Dental College and Research Institute, Sri Ganganagar,Rajasthan, India
 
Dr. Vikram Pal Aggarwal, M.D.S, Senior Lecturer
Department of Public Health Dentistry, Surendera Dental College and Research Institute, Sri Ganganagar,Rajasthan, India
 

 192 KB
Language: English

 

 
Titre 5-17
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5. Swimming together - A splendid experience

article 5.1-17
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This paper throws light on the invisible inner feelings of most of the parents, especially mothers of the mentally handicapped, that are normally hidden and not expressed, for fear of getting break-ups in the on-going family relations and constraints in the continued-marital tie ups.

India’s Social Structure is different from that of other advanced countries. Ancient India carries a great traditional treasure consisting of invaluable cultural heritage. Most of the Indian families prefer to live under the control of one family head, honoring the traditionally structured family system. Principle of obedience play a greater role and family members are abide to certain verbal and unwritten rules by habitual practice. They love to follow simply what parents say ( sons) and daughters in-law are expected to follow what their husband says. The in-laws act as custodians and administer the family affairs. This time-honored practice is imbibed in the Indian culture and this tradition is being transmitted from generation to generation.

The strong convictions and unchanged attitude of the elderly started bringing plenty of problems in due course of time causing confusion and greater misunderstanding in the day to day family affairs. Non-attention or negative expression of the daughters-in-law to in-laws result in splits in the family and even to separation of wife and husband.

Families having a kid with mental retardation is not an exception from this situation. This blind-belief traditional practice started hitting the confidence of the parents greatly, especially mothers, creating plenty of parent-related problems, such as worry, tension, fear, disappointment, feeling of insecurity etc that encircle the whole family. If these problems are neglected and not given proper attention they may turn into major family-centered issues and affect the whole family breaking into pieces.

It is evident that difficulties do not arise from external environment. They spring out only from the structured- goals and un-matching demands of either the in-laws or sometimes the parents themselves. Mothers that are caught in the conventional and traditional family framework become tongue-tied and greatly inept as their lives are more thretened and questioned for security. Such mothers must be brought out of the age-old structured-family-system that keeps them under the firm fist of meddle ling mothers in-law.

This requires brimming confidence in such mothers to help them realize their inner power and to know their parental responsibilities properly. A sense of awareness creation and understanding promotion is highly essential.

For this purpose several Symposiums and various workshops were organized at Lebenshilfe to answer the questions raised by parents, to address their concerns and also to help them advocate the causes ,voicing their opinions.

Article 5.2-17
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Dr. T.Saraswathi Devi M.A; PhD,
Founder & Executive Director Lebenshilfe (regd) India, Distinguished Member Scientific Committee (EJID- European Journal of Intellectual Disability) Switzerland, Intensive in-service trainee Lebenshilfe Germany in the field of mental retardation,Member,IASE 9USA)
 
 193 KB
Language: English
 
Titre 6-17
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6. Sentence discontinuous constituents and implicit learning limitations in Down Syndrome

Article 6.1-17
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Children with Down syndrome experiment specific difficulties in morphosyntactical development. In particular, they demonstrate marked shortcomings in handling discontinuous constituents in sentences. It is suggested that these shortcomings stem from a conjugated deficit in some aspects of implicit procedural learning and relational semantics.Recommendations are made for rehabilitative intervention.

Keywords: syntactical development, grammatical morphology, semantical development, implicit procedural learning, artificial grammar.

  

Article 6.2-17
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Jean Adolphe Rondal
University of Liège Department of Cognitive sciences, B-32 Sart Tilman 4000 Liège, Belgium.
Email: jeanarondal@skynet.be
 
 532 KB
Language: English
 
 
Titre 7-17
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7. Beyond the organization. Burnout and psychogeriatric work in the globalisation era

Article 7.1-17
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Initially confined to care and school settings, the burnout phenomenon has now spread to all work settings within the labour market.

Moreover, in the near future, the demographic shift will take its toll, even on health professions. Globalisation-induced migration flows will cause major problems since professionals from different cultures will have different education and training backgrounds.

Burnout research therefore needs to become broader in scope. The problem of burnout must no longer be approached merely from a psychological or psychosocial angle. Instead, research should take labour market changes into account as well.

In psychiatric and gerontological fields, labour market variables will play a major role. They may even become every bit as relevant as specific variables linked to work processes (e.g. challenging behavior).

A multidisciplinary approach to the study of burnout is needed, one in which not only physicians, psychologists and social caregivers but also economists, social policy experts, sociologists exchange information and work together.

Key-words: Burnout, psychogeriatrics, health services, globalisation

  

Article 7.2-17
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Ennio Cocco,  MD, MHEM Psychiatre
NEPsySMAB (Granges/Marnand - Lausanne) Suisse
Fondation OVE (Décines-Charpieu) France

Correspondance:
Ennio Cocco, MD, MEGS.
A.D.A.P.E.I. de l’Ain, CENORD, 10 rue Marc Seguin, 01100 Bourg-en-Bresse Cedex, France.
Phone: 0033 / 4 /74421050
mail: ennio.cocco@adapei01.asso.fr
 
 255 KB
Language: English
 
 
 
Titre 8-17
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8. The broken mirror

Article 8.1-17
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This work is based on a nine month clinical experience in a adult psychiatric day hospital. I was participating in a talking group made up of patients with very different pathologies. I’ve decided to center this work on a patient in particular: Julien. On one hand, his way of seeing life seemed to be a lot different from mine, which was raising my interest. One the other hand, the countertransference he caused on the group and myself was also raising my interest. Julien is a carrier of the Asperger syndrome, trouble of the autistic spectrum. This syndrome is characterised by a lack of social comprehension, a limited capacity to communicate with others and a strong interest for a field in particular. Social learning of people with Asperger syndrome could be compared to scholar learning considering the time, focus and energy it demands (Attwood, 2006).

In psychiatric and gerontological fields, labour market variables will play a major role. They may even become every bit as relevant as specific variables linked to work processes (e.g. challenging behavior).

A multidisciplinary approach to the study of burnout is needed, one in which not only physicians, psychologists and social caregivers but also economists, social policy experts, sociologists exchange information and work together.

Key-words: Burnout, psychogeriatrics, health services, globalisation.
 
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Article 8.2-17
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Maïa Cloé Vella

Etudiante en Master 2 Psychologie Clinique et Psychopathologie à l’Université d’Aix-Marseille
Master 1 Psychologie Clinique Psychanalytique, Université Lumière Lyon II
35 rue Saint Antoine 69003 LYON 

Tél: +33 06 65 47 12 88
Email: maia.vella@univ-lyon2.fr
 
 255 KB
Language: French
 
 
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