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Title article 1-15
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1. Creating a shared data collection tool for persons with intellectual disabilities - Exploratory Study

Article 1.1-15
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Intellectual disability affects approximately 2-3% of the population. It is defined as a significant limitation in intellectual functioning of 2 standard deviations below the average IQ, an adaptive behavior of 2 standard deviations below the mean in at least two of three dimensions: conceptual, social, or practicing skills, all these symptoms occurring before the age of 18 years old. No register of people with intellectual disabilities is available in France. Field professionals have expressed the need to create a shared data collection tool to identify an unknown population and facilitate collaborative research to improve caring for such people. Such a project raises three questions:

  1. What is the relevance of a specific measurement tool to intellectual disabilities?
  2. Is a professional consensus around a respectful metrological approach of a singular life trajectory possible?
  3. What indicators are needed? The present exploratory study aims to assess the relevance of a collection of data shared by interviewing 12 clinical professionals who work daily with children and adults suffering from intellectual disabilities. Understanding their needs must be considered.
Keywords: Intellectual Disability; Mental Retardation; Data register; Therapeutic strategies; Research;
 
Article 1.2-15
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Corine Bebin, INTELLICURE//INSHEA Diplômée de l’IEP de Paris et de l’INSHEA
 
 348 KB
Language: English
 
Titre article 2-15
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2.A supportive response and development program of behavioral and social skills of a student with syndrome Tourette - a Case Study

Article 2.1-15
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This paper intends to present a supportive intervention program for the behavioral and social skills of an elementary school pupil with Tourette syndrome. The aims of our behavioral- psychological intervention have focused on the development of interpersonal skills to cope with interpersonal difficulties, such as difficulties in communication, understanding, expressing emotions and the lack of social skills, as well as behavioral problems, such as difficulty in complying with rules, difficulty in accepting limits, attention deficit, antisocial behavior and difficulty in group integration. The program has been intensive and has lasted for one year. The majority of the aims have been achieved.

Keywords: S. Tourette, behavioral - psychological intervention, interpersonal difficulties, behavioral problems.
 
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Article 2.2-15
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Dr Ekaterina P. Stavrou
 
University of Ioannina, Department of Pre-school Education, Greece
 
 91 KB
Language: English
 
Titre article 3-15
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3. Pedagogy, education and activities at Lebenshilfe

Article 3.1-15
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Needs, may differ from person to person. It is needless to say that every single individual carries certain needs, which grow with the growing age. Having needs is natural and meeting certain needs is essential for a healthy life promotion. People often get confused in differentiating essential needs from demanding desires. Desires are self-oriented and needs are situation-oriented as far as mentally retarded are concerned. To my experience, most of the desires can be satisfied with financial strength and maximum needs could be met with a sense of understanding over the situation. Meeting some pressing desires leads to personal satisfaction and attending certain essential needs lead to quality life promotion. Needs of people with mental retardation are considered as special needs. They require proper recognition and appropriate attention. Lack of proper medical care and negligence in attending special needs create physical, psychological, social, spiritual abilities deterioration. If they are neglected and felt not required, they damage the functional abilities affecting the healthy life thus leading to functional declension.

 
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Article 3.2-15
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Dr T.Saraswathi Devi, M.A; PhD, Founder & Executive Director Lebenshilfe (regd) India,
 
Distinguished Member Scientific Committee (EJID- European Journal of Intellectual Disability) Switzerland, Intensive in-service trainee Lebenshilfe Germany in the field of mental retardation,Member,IASE 9USA)
 
 
 198 KB
Language: English
 
Titre article 4-15
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4. From Locked Homes to Secured Societies. History starting from yesteryears

Article 4.1-15
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This chapter gives the synthesis of the entire work experience of the author for over three and half decades. In one way it is like a keynote of the article and will form a clear cut understanding of what motivated the author to bring Lebenshilfe into existence and how this organization is being driven towards its goal, pushing towards heights of achievements overcoming hardships and to reach its heights through various innovative therapies and need based activities etc.

Article 4.2-15
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Dr T.Saraswathi Devi, M.A; PhD, Founder & Executive Director Lebenshilfe (regd) India,
 
Distinguished Member Scientific Committee (EJID- European Journal of Intellectual Disability) Switzerland, Intensive in-service trainee Lebenshilfe Germany in the field of mental retardation,Member,IASE 9USA)
 
 
 118 KB
Language: English
 
Titre article 5-15
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5. Vestibular stimulation and alertness in individuals with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities

Article 5.1-15
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Background: Individuals with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities (PIMD) experience a large number of difficulties when engaging in activities. Because vestibular stimulation has been described as a precondition for other types of stimulation, the present study focuses on this type of stimulation.

Method: Video observations were conducted for 21 participants during one-on-one interactions with a direct support person (DSP) in three different situations: 1) vestibular stimulation, 2) visual/auditory stimulation, and 3) visual/auditory stimulation following vestibular stimulation with alertness as the dependent variable. Each situation was videotaped once for each participant.

Results: The descriptive statistics revealed several differences in alertness reactions between the conditions. Still, these differences were not statistically significant. In addition, large differences between subgroups based on gender, age groups, visual impairment, and epilepsy have been found.

Conclusions: DSPs can be advised to adapt the stimulation situation to the individual needs and preferences before presenting vestibular stimulation to individuals with PIMD in clinical practice.

Keywords: Alertness, individuals with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities, vestibular stimulation, distant stimulation

 

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Article 5.2-15
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V.S. Munde (corresponding author) and C. Vlaskamp
 
Humboldt-University Berlin Department of Rehabilitation SciencesUnter den Linden 6 10099 Berlin, Germany
E-mail: vera.munde@hu-berlin.de; C.Vlaskamp@rug.nl
Telephone: +49 30 2093 4380
Fax: +49 30 2093 4437.
 
 318 KB
Language: English
 
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