Titre article 1-18
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1. « WE BELIEVED SHE WAS EXCLUDED… » The hard of hearing and the world of soud

Article 1.1-18
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The article “They thought she was excluded…The hearing-impaired and the world of sound” tells the story of the musical education that takes place between a severely deaf child and her music teacher.

The work is divided into two sections: an Explanatory Section and a Practical Section, which follow on from the Foreword and Introduction.

Hearing loss is dealt with in the EXPLANATORY SECTION. Personal experience of this particular case is described, together with the search for a transmissible musical pedagogy.

In the PRACTICAL SECTION, concrete achievements are demonstrated and the working methods explained.

The CONCLUSIONS highlight the fact that hearing-impaired children are able to participate in music-learning and its related activities.

The paper ends with Appendices, which include

  • an article by L. Ritzuto “Quel éveil musical pour demain?” What musical awakening for tomorrow?”; °
  • a report linked to the Studio de Musique Contemporaine; and °
  • the Rights of the Child.

In “They thought she was excluded…” the author tells the story of an astonishing educational journey involving her relationship with a severely deaf child during the course of a musical education.

Although other avenues for learning were offered to the child, it was learning music that gave her the most joy and pleasure. She was able to discover the existence of another means of communication—not verbal but still through sound—and learn that this could transform a lesson into a «House of notes».

Although the teacher had no preparation for this type of education, she was aware that if a spirit of initiative can effectively solve some of the problems to be found in educational situations, the focus had to be on

  • understanding the mechanisms underlying these problems and
  • extracting common rules for organising different systems, which might lead to finding the appropriate course of action. That course of action would be established in agreement with the little girl.

This work is divided into two sections: an Explanatory Section and a Practical Section, which follow on from the Foreword and Introduction.

Hearing loss is dealt with in the EXPLANATORY SECTION. Personal experience of this particular case is described, together with the search for a transmissible musical pedagogy.

In the PRACTICAL SECTION, concrete achievements are demonstrated and the working methods explained.

The CONCLUSIONS are followed by Appendices which include

  • an article, «Quel éveil musical pour demain?» [What musical awakening for tomorrow?] and
  • a report linked to the Studio de Musique Contemporaine [Studio for Contemporary Music] and
  • the Rights of the Child.

The experience was significant in that it showed how musical aptitude is independent of hearing loss. It highlighted the fact that although each child has different predispositions, any teacher, by adapting his or her knowledge to suit the child, can bring out their potential. Consequently, children who are hearing-impaired can be included in music-learning and musical activities.

Furthermore, the use of electronic instruments for teaching, combined with other research and experiments involving verbal and musical communication, with their analogies and differences, can contribute to opening up musical education to a greater number of children, whether handicapped or not.

Keywords: Pet therapy, controversy, diversity in therapeutic approaches
 
Article 1.2-18
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Laetitia F. Ritzuto
Docteur en Sciences de l’Éducation, Doctorat Européen Université Lumière 2 Lyon FR
Licence és FAPSE Université de Genève CH
MAGISTERO Pianoforte Conservatoire d’État V. Bellini Palermo IT

 
 2133 KB
Language: French
 
Article 2.1-18
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In the case of persons with autistic spectrum disorder and intellectual disability, who may have limited or absent verbal communication, conventional educational and psychotherapeutic interventions provide only limited improvement. The presence of behavioural disorders adds difficulties in social integration and adaptation in socio-educational institutions, highlighting the need for innovative approaches for this population. Animal-assisted therapy is a specific context of intervention used as a complement to conventional therapies, where the animal plays an intermediary role between the therapist and the patient. Although many studies tend to demonstrate that this method is beneficial, the benefits are rarely fully explained and the role of the therapist is quite completely forgotten.

Proposing animal assisted therapy in our psychiatric unit since 2008, we observed beneficial effects in many patients. The aim of the present article is then to describe the method used with one adult patient who present autism spectrum disorder and severe intellectual disability and for whom animal assisted therapy with a dog permitted a real improvement of his mood and a significant decrease in behavioural disorders measured with the Aberrant Behavior Checklist.

The evolution of the patient has been slow, but his present state is mostly very positive, with real change in his mood and disappearance of behavioural disorders. Indeed, the patient ABC scores show a clear amelioration. He also speaks more spontaneously and responds more adequately to questions, he composes sentences to talk about his state of mind and he no longer exhibits self- and hetero-aggressive behaviours.

The analysis of this patient’s evolution allows us to highlight the therapeutic processes that can take place in this type of intervention. In addition, we describe several therapy mechanisms generally involved in animal assisted therapy, where the therapist also plays of course a fundamental role.

Keywords: Animal assisted therapy, autism spectrum disorder, intellectual disability

  

Article 2.2-18
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Corresponding authors:
 
Rachel Lehotkay, PhD
Psychologist, psychotherapist specialized in animal assisted therapy
Psychiatric Unit of Mental Development Department of Mental Health and Psychiatry University Hospitals of Geneva Chemin du Petit Bel-Air, 2 1225 Chêne-Bourg (GE) Switzerland
Email: Rachel.Lehotkay@hcuge.ch

 
Giuliana Galli Carminati, MD, PhDs
Psychiatrist psychotherapist FMH, Psychoanalysist IIPB, pet assisted therapist Assistant Professor at the Seoul National University Bundang Hospital (SNUBH) Seoul National University, Seoul, Korea; International Psychoanalytical Society Charles Baudoin, Geneva, Switzerland
Email: giulianagallicarminati@hotmail.com

 
Federico Carminati, PhD
Physicist at the European Organization for Nuclear Research, Geneva, Switzerand; pet assisted therapist, International Psychoanalytical Society Charles Baudoin, Geneva, Switzerland
Email: federico.carminati@gmail.com

 263 KB
Language: English

 
Titre article 3-18
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3. Medicine and Disability: Collaboration between the doctor and the educational team

Article 3.1-18
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Persons with disabilities (mostly for intellectual disability) are usually accompanied in their daily life by specialized educators. The consulting physician treating this population, needs to closely collaborate with specialized educators in orther to give them an adecuate care. Reinforced cooperation is needed to reach an appropiate diagnosis and to install the right treatment to his patient. Here we present you the medical point of view of this complex relation. With the idea of building a bridge between these two different professions, the author searches common points between them as a way of improving their interaction.

Keywords: Interdisciplinary collaboration, nursing and medical care for the person with a disability, socio-educational work related to care

    

Article 3.2-18
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Dr Christian Winckler, Médecin Spécialiste FMH en Médecine interne générale
Père de 3 enfants, titulaire d’un diplôme fédéral de Médecin et d’un titre postgrade FMH en médecine interne générale. Diplôme de Médecin obtenu à Buenos Aires en Argentine en 1998, après un début de carrière en Argentine, depuis 2002, il a accompli sa formation post-graduée en Suisse, son pays d’origine. Entre juillet 2012 et jusqu’à fin janvier 2018, il a exercé comme médecin responsable de l’hébergement socio-éducatif au sein de l’Institution de Lavigny, offrant également une activité en cabinet ouverte au public. Actuellement il est Médecin de famille au Centre Médical du Simplon à Renens, un établissement de l’EHC et aussi médecin responsable de trois établissements socio-éducatifs dans le canton de Vaud.

Email: christian.winckler@ehc.vd.ch
 128 KO
Langue: Français
 
Titre article 4-18
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4. Animal assisted interventions, about controversies...

Article 4-1-18
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Message to skeptics, doubters, puzzleds and others...

Scientific background, I like to argue, discuss, elaborate around a subject and often contradict so much that I have already been reproached for it. I like to play with skepticism, in the idea of going ever further in the knowledge. So I have nothing against skeptics in general, from Quebec or elsewhere, or against those whose workhorse boils down to a particular subject, on which they on which they strive without anyone really knowing why… What is troublesome, however, is when critics do not lead anywhere and the arguments lack intelligence. The result is all the more annoying when you know the subject criticized.

Thus, practicing as a psychologist psychotherapist and pet therapist for almost 15 years, having researched and published in the field, I think I know my subject. Obviously, everyone is free to express doubts as to the benefits of pet therapy or the presence of animals in general, it is not done for everyone ... but still it is necessary that the arguments hold the road ... And then, for some reason, the manipulation of the reader - with sophisticated words and well-chosen references - annoys me.

This text therefore presents what animal assisted interventions really are, with an example of practice adapted to a particular population, and why critics lack substance. For me, if the debate is possible, it is still open to the input of arguments allowing us a real intelligent dialogue, so that the great minds meet...

Keywords: Zootherapy, animal assisted interventions, controversies, psychotherapy, autism, intellectual disability
 
 
Article 4-2-18
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Rachel Lehotkay
PhD, Psychologist, psychotherapist specialized in animal assisted therapy Psychiatric Unit of Mental Development Department of Mental Health and Psychiatry University Hospitals of Geneva
Chemin du Petit Bel-Air, 2
1225 Chêne-Bourg (GE) Switzerland

Email: Rachel.Lehotkay@hcuge.ch

 
 124 KB

Language: French
 
Titre article 5-18
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5. The right to become a mother: reflection on a psychotherapeutic situation linked to disability

Article 5-1-18
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This paper presents a clinical situation of a young mother suffering from a mild mental disability. She consults after the birth of her son. The scope of this article is to present the intervention develpped around the child and the mother who was separated from the father. A multidisciplinary accompaniment was necessary and allowed this young woman to empower herself and to live with her child despite the slight mental handicap. Following this clinical presentation, different theoretical and reflexive aspects about access to parenthood for people with mental disability are discussed.

Many thanks to Gregory Zecca for the proofreading, as well as the corrections he proposed for the writing of this paper.

Keywords: Parenthood, mild handicap, personal balance, family balance
 
 
Titre 6.18
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6. An analytical model in a context of a specialized early intervention

Article 6.1.18
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This paper presents an analytical model to be used in a context of a specialized early intervention based on early intervention evidences, this model wish to integrate in an harmonious way, the clinical process used in rehabilitation settings with the Human Development Model - Handicap Production Process, (MDH-PPH), Fougeyrollas (2010). Thus, the main theoretical bases of early intervention, a brief overview of the MDH-PPH and the challenges experimented when using this model in an early intervention context are discussed to justify the need for a model such as the one proposed. This model is then defined by its origins, objectives, components and its main purpose: the adoption of an educational project involving parents, children and professionals from various disciplines. Therefore, the interdisciplinary team including the parents using this model would first identify the main goals of the intervention as well as the desired changes on the child’s life skills and then would elaborate goals and objectives to develop these skills in each of the intervention domains. This model also guide a deeper understanding of the interrelations that exist between the childs’s strenghts and challenges in each of the developemental domains and how the child particular profile will intereact with the social and physical aspects of his environement.

Keywords: Model, analysis, early intervention, disability creation process, interdisciplinary

 

 
 
Article 6.2.18
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Author responsible for communications
Julie McIntyre, M.O.A., orthophoniste
Professeure de formation pratique agrégée, directrice de l’enseignement clinique, école d’orthophonie et d’audiologie, faculté de médecine, Université de Montréal, C.P. 6128, succursale Centre-ville, Montréal (Québec) H3C 3J7
Email: julie.mc.intyre@umontreal.ca
 
Other authors
Myriam Rousseau, Chercheuse en établissement 
Centre intégré universitaire de santé et de services sociaux de la Mauricie-et-du-Centre-du-Québec, Direction de l'enseignement universitaire, de la recherche et de l'innovation, 15 rue Rubin, Victoriaville (QC), G6P 9V7
Email: myriam_rousseau@ssss.gouv.qc.ca

Jacinthe Bourassa, Agente de planification, programmation et recherche 
Centre intégré universitaire de santé et de services sociaux de la Mauricie-et-du-Centre-du-Québec, Direction de l'enseignement universitaire, de la recherche et de l'innovation, 1025, rue Marguerite-Bourgeoys, Trois-Rivières (QC), G8Z 3T1
Email: jacynthe_bourassa@ssss.gouv.qc.ca
 
Roxanne Ouellette, Agente de planification, programmation et recherche 
Centre intégré universitaire de santé et de services sociaux de la Mauricie-et-du-Centre-du-Québec, Direction de l'enseignement universitaire, de la recherche et de l'innovation, 1025, rue Marguerite-Bourgeoys, Trois-Rivières (QC), G8Z 3T1
Email: roxanne_ouellette_crditedmcqiu@ssss.gouv.qc.ca
 
Yves Boisvert, Formateur associé au RIPPH 
177, Place Sainte-Claire, Laval (QC) H7L 3H3
Email  etoile.dunord@videotron.ca
 

 278 KB
Language: French

 
Titre article 7-18
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7. Mirror Psychopedagogy in the Population with Severe Autism and Intellectual Disability (SAID)

Article 7-1-18
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Environment, activity and calm in Severe Autism and Intellectual Dishability

Severe autism is very difficult to differentiate from severe / profound mental impairment, because the autistic triad (difficulty in social and verbal relation, difficulty in anticipating and abnormal sensory perceptions) is present in both situations. Severe autism affects about 0.1% of the general population and requires very important psycho-educational care and a very expensive human and economic investment.

This short note aims to suggest a possible - and relatively easy - solution to situations in which people with Severe Autism and Intellectual Disability (SAID) become very difficult to manage in a socio-educational setting and are therefore bound to live long psychiatric hospitalizations.

These difficult situations where the person is in crisis with agitation, great anxiety and aggression towards oneself and / or others are well known by socio-educational teams caring for this population. It is here, when the person needs on one hand be structured with an activity, but, on the other hand, does not stand the frustration of not succeeding that the “mirror psychopedagogy” takes all its value.

Key words: Severe Autism and Intellectual Disability (SAID), “mirror psychopedagogy”, quality of life
 
 
Article 7-2-18
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Giuliana Galli Carminati, MD, PhDs
Psychiatrist psychotherapist FMH, Psychoanalysist IIPB, pet assisted therapist Assistant Professor at the Seoul National University Bundang Hospital (SNUBH) Seoul National University, Seoul, Korea; International Psychoanalytical Society Charles Baudoin, Geneva, Switzerland
Email: giulianagallicarminati@hotmail.com
 
Federico Carminati, PhD
Physicist at the European Organization for Nuclear Research, Geneva, Switzerand; pet assisted therapist, International Psychoanalytical Society Charles Baudoin, Geneva, Switzerland
Email: federico.carminati@gmail.com
 
  77 KB 
Language: French
 
Titre article 8-18
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8. «I» and «They»: Is the inability of children with ASD (Autism Spectrum Disorder) to distinct themselves from others apparent to their human figure drawings compared to their TD (Typical Developing) peers?

Article 8-1-18
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One of the predominant features of children belonging to the autistic spectrum disorder is their inability to distinct themselves from others. There is, also, evidence that drawings of human forms by children with autism tend to lack variety, possibly because they reflect the unusual way these children think about and relate to other people. Based on the above references we hypothesized children’s drawings of human figures apart from their general intellectual and artistic abilities reveal things about their awareness and conception of themselves and others. The aim of the current study is to investigate if the inability of autistic children to distinct themselves from others appears in their human drawings too as a consequence of their limit social and communicative experience. For this purpose, 12 children were recruited, 6 with ASD and 6 typically developing matched on gender and chronological and verbal mental age. Both groups were asked to produce three human figures (one to represent their father, one for their mother and a third one to represent themselves). Then, they requested to draw a house, a house of a relative or a close to them person (grandparents, friends etc.) and at last their own house. The human and house drawings were scored using standardized procedures (McCarthy’s Scale, 1972 and Lee and Hobson’s Scale, 2006) for assessing accuracy, detail and complexity. The results revealed that the human figure drawing scores of children with ASD were slightly lower than those of the typically developing children but there were no significant score differences within the drawing scores of autistic group. As it was expected, there were no score differences within the autistic group regarding the drawings of the two genders, which is not apply in case of their TD peers. What is worth mentioning is that lack of distinction was not restricted exclusively in case of human figures but also on house drawings of autistic children as the score contrast was not high enough. This last result may be affected by the small number of the sample, therefore it is doubtful and cannot be generalized.

Keywords:Autism Spectrum Disorder, High Functioning Autism, the Self and the Others, Human and House Drawings
 
 
Article 8-2-18
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Sarris Dimitrios, Assistant Professor of Special Education
Director of Laboratory Hall of Special and Therapeutic Education, Department of Early Childhood Education (E.C.E.D.U.),University of Ioannina, Northwest Greece, Greece
Email:sarrisdem@gmail.com

Riga Pinelopi, Research Assistant 
Laboratory Hall of Special and Therapeutic Education, Department of Early Childhood Education (E.C.E.D.U.), University of Ioannina, Northwest Greece, Greece
Email:pineriga@gmail.com

Zaragkas K. Charilaos, Assistant Professor 
Department of Early Childhood Education (E.C.E.D.U.),University of Ioannina, Northwest Greece, Greece
Email:hzaragas@gmail.com

Papadimitropoulou Panagoula, Research Assistant,
Master of Education, University of Rouen, France
Email:yioulipapad@gmail.com

 
  829 KB
Language: English
 
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